Bulgaria invites the Perseid meteors on August 12 and 13

 

The Perseid meteors of 2022 will peak between August 12 and 13, but it will be completed by the moon, which will be packed on August 11.

In addition, the August 2022 full moon is a supermoon, which is a phenomenon that occurs when the full moon coincides with the closest approach to Earth in its orbit, making the moon appear more prominent than usual.

Unfortunately, the current forecast calls for partly cloudy or even rainy weather for most of Bulgaria on August 12 and 13.

It’s entirely possible in 2022, the best time to observe rain in the Northern Hemisphere is deep night and the hours before dawn, but brighter meteors could be seen as early as 10 p.m., according to NASA.

Perseid’s meteors have been observed for at least two millennia and are composed of chunks of dust and ice that follow Comet Swift-Tuttle, which orbits the sun every 133 years, according to NASA.

Their name comes from the fact that they seem to emanate from the constellation of Perseus.

According to NASA, with the decline of the full moon, the Perseids will begin to fade on Aug. 21 and 22 and will cease entirely on Sept. 1.

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Bulgaria invites the Perseid meteors on August 12 and 13

 
The Perseid meteors of 2022 will peak between August 12 and 13, but it will be completed by the moon, which will be packed on August 11. In addition, the August 2022 full moon is a supermoon, which is a phenomenon that occurs when the full moon coincides with the closest approach to Earth in its orbit, making the moon appear more prominent than usual. Unfortunately, the current forecast calls for partly cloudy or even rainy weather for most of Bulgaria on August 12 and 13. It's entirely possible in 2022, the best time to observe rain in the Northern Hemisphere is deep night and the hours before dawn, but brighter meteors could be seen as early as 10 p.m., according to NASA. Perseid's meteors have been observed for at least two millennia and are composed of chunks of dust and ice that follow Comet Swift-Tuttle, which orbits the sun every 133 years, according to NASA. Their name comes from the fact that they seem to emanate from the constellation of Perseus. According to NASA, with the decline of the full moon, the Perseids will begin to fade on Aug. 21 and 22 and will cease entirely on Sept. 1.
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