New York relives dark hours because of monkeypox

 

The health crisis returns to New York, facing an increase in cases of monkeypox and strong demand for vaccines, announced Wednesday, July 13 to have alerted the federal authorities on “the urgency” to extend the vaccination against this disease.

New York, which is the largest U.S. city – between 8 and 9 million people -, officially counted Wednesday, July 13 336 “probable” cases of monkeypox, compared to 267 the day before and 223 on Monday, July 11, figures that do not reflect the totality of an “epidemic on the rise,” according to the New York Department of Health.

On July 12, the health services had to apologize after many failures on the website for booking vaccines, “overwhelmed by traffic”, while 1,250 appointment slots were available, prompting protests on social networks.

The city’s Democratic mayor, Eric Adams, said he had a phone meeting with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to “discuss the supply constraints facing New York City and the urgency of expanding vaccination to more people, in more neighborhoods, with more partners and providers.”

“We also expressed our commitment to quickly address the current shortage with the necessary funding, commensurate with the health burden facing New York City, the epicentre of the monkeypox outbreak,” Eric Adams added in a statement.

New York City was scheduled to receive 14,500 doses from the U.S. government this week, adding to nearly 7,000 received since June 23.

Not fatal, monkeypox disease causes a rash that can look like pimples or blisters and has flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache and fatigue.

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New York relives dark hours because of monkeypox

  The health crisis returns to New York, facing an increase in cases of monkeypox and strong demand for vaccines, announced Wednesday, July 13 to have alerted the federal authorities on "the urgency" to extend the vaccination against this disease. New York, which is the largest U.S. city - between 8 and 9 million people -, officially counted Wednesday, July 13 336 "probable" cases of monkeypox, compared to 267 the day before and 223 on Monday, July 11, figures that do not reflect the totality of an "epidemic on the rise," according to the New York Department of Health. On July 12, the health services had to apologize after many failures on the website for booking vaccines, "overwhelmed by traffic", while 1,250 appointment slots were available, prompting protests on social networks. The city's Democratic mayor, Eric Adams, said he had a phone meeting with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to "discuss the supply constraints facing New York City and the urgency of expanding vaccination to more people, in more neighborhoods, with more partners and providers." "We also expressed our commitment to quickly address the current shortage with the necessary funding, commensurate with the health burden facing New York City, the epicentre of the monkeypox outbreak," Eric Adams added in a statement. New York City was scheduled to receive 14,500 doses from the U.S. government this week, adding to nearly 7,000 received since June 23. Not fatal, monkeypox disease causes a rash that can look like pimples or blisters and has flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache and fatigue.
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