More than 80% of the world’s population could be affected by Climate change

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Almost 100,000 studies published between 1951 and 2018 were studied by a team of researchers and sifted through them, aided by computer systems. “We have overwhelming evidence that climate change is affecting every continent, every system,” study author Max Callaghan told AFP. With researchers from the Berlin-based Mercator Research Institute, he mapped the globe and mapped the impacts of climate change
 
The result is that 80% of the Earth, home to 85% of the world’s population, is covered by studies predicting warming-related changes in temperature and precipitation. Studies disproportionately document impacts in richer countries, while they are less documented in poorer countries, Callaghan said. Trends in rainfall and temperature changes in Africa could be linked to climate change, “but we don’t have many studies documenting the consequences of these trends,” he says, calling it a “blind spot in our knowledge of impacts. Research on climate change has grown exponentially in recent years, with about 1,500 studies published between 1951 and 1990, and 75,000 to 85,000 in the last five years.
 
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More than 80% of the world’s population could be affected by Climate change

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More than 80% of the world’s population could be affected by Climate change

 

Almost 100,000 studies published between 1951 and 2018 were studied by a team of researchers and sifted through them, aided by computer systems. "We have overwhelming evidence that climate change is affecting every continent, every system," study author Max Callaghan told AFP. With researchers from the Berlin-based Mercator Research Institute, he mapped the globe and mapped the impacts of climate change
 The result is that 80% of the Earth, home to 85% of the world's population, is covered by studies predicting warming-related changes in temperature and precipitation. Studies disproportionately document impacts in richer countries, while they are less documented in poorer countries, Callaghan said. Trends in rainfall and temperature changes in Africa could be linked to climate change, "but we don't have many studies documenting the consequences of these trends," he says, calling it a "blind spot in our knowledge of impacts. Research on climate change has grown exponentially in recent years, with about 1,500 studies published between 1951 and 1990, and 75,000 to 85,000 in the last five years. 
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More than 80% of the world’s population could be affected by Climate change

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More than 80% of the world’s population could be affected by Climate change

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More than 80% of the world’s population could be affected by Climate change

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More than 80% of the world’s population could be affected by Climate change

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