The ecological impact of mass consumption

According to the United Nations, more than 50 million tons of furniture and accessories are thrown away each year, almost as much as electronic devices.

We recycle a tiny part of it; in fact, more than 80 million tons of plastic, metal, foam, glass, wood, silicone, steel, ferrous metals, and carbon end up in landfills.

A real ecological disaster.

How did we get to this situation, and what are the solutions?

Thirty-five years ago, globalization was in its infancy, and consumers were buying furniture or a TV with the intention to keep them for ten years or more. Also, the furniture was passed on from parents to children.

With the explosion of globalization, new products such as telephones, laptops, laptops, big-screen TVs and large retail chains in the furniture such as Ikea, prices have fallen, and consumerism has done the rest to get to this disastrous ecological state.

As time went by, it became even more common to buy furniture in the same way as buying shirts depending on a consumer's moods; mass production from China allowing these whims, although materials of inferior quality, which are often very toxic.

With online shopping, it takes only one click to directly receive some furniture from China, some furniture that has a dramatic impact on the carbon footprint.

The solution is to buy locally with local manufacturers who use authentic materials and specifications according to the environment, return to actual values, and the love of a product made with real wood. A life full of authenticity. Manufacturers with specific ecological charters are continuously growing in all countries, and consumers are willing to spend more on quality products.

For those with smaller budgets, there are other alternatives, such as second-hand products by changing covers or mobile phones and devices and refurbished electronics.

Due to this COVID-19 pandemic, consumers have become more aware of their responsibility to turn this tragic situation of over-pollution into a position of controlled and responsible consumption.

MDS

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According to the United Nations, more than 50 million tons of furniture and accessories are thrown away each year, almost as much as electronic devices.

We recycle a tiny part of it; in fact, more than 80 million tons of plastic, metal, foam, glass, wood, silicone, steel, ferrous metals, and carbon end up in landfills.

A real ecological disaster.


How did we get to this situation, and what are the solutions?


Thirty-five years ago, globalization was in its infancy, and consumers were buying furniture or a TV with the intention to keep them for ten years or more. Also, the furniture was passed on from parents to children.


With the explosion of globalization, new products such as telephones, laptops, laptops, big-screen TVs and large retail chains in the furniture such as Ikea, prices have fallen, and consumerism has done the rest to get to this disastrous ecological state.


As time went by, it became even more common to buy furniture in the same way as buying shirts depending on a consumer's moods; mass production from China allowing these whims, although materials of inferior quality, which are often very toxic.

With online shopping, it takes only one click to directly receive some furniture from China, some furniture that has a dramatic impact on the carbon footprint.




The solution is to buy locally with local manufacturers who use authentic materials and specifications according to the environment, return to actual values, and the love of a product made with real wood. A life full of authenticity. Manufacturers with specific ecological charters are continuously growing in all countries, and consumers are willing to spend more on quality products.


For those with smaller budgets, there are other alternatives, such as second-hand products by changing covers or mobile phones and devices and refurbished electronics.


Due to this COVID-19 pandemic, consumers have become more aware of their responsibility to turn this tragic situation of over-pollution into a position of controlled and responsible consumption.

MDS

Share on facebook
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Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
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Pinterest

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The ecological impact of mass consumption

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The ecological impact of mass consumption

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The ecological impact of mass consumption

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The ecological impact of mass consumption

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